Kentucky Curriculum Standards | Orbit Earth Expo

Kindergarten First GradeSecond GradeThird GradeFourth GradeFifth Grade ♦ Sixth Grade


Kindergarten

LS1.C: Organization for Matter and Energy Flow in Organisms All animals need food in order to live and grow. They obtain their food from plants or from other animals. Plants need water and light to live and grow. (K-LS1-1)

ETS1.B: Developing Possible Solutions Designs can be conveyed through sketches, drawings, or physical models. These representations are useful in communicating ideas for a problem’s solutions to other people

PS3.B: Conservation of Energy and Energy Transfer Sunlight warms Earth’s surface.

K.G.1 Describe objects in the environment using names of shapes, and describe the relative positions of these objects using terms such as above, below, beside, in front of, behind, and next to.

K.G.3 Identify shapes as two-dimensional (lying in a plane, “flat”) or three-dimensional (“solid”).

Patterns: Patterns in the natural world can be observed, used to describe phenomena, and used as evidence. (K-ESS21)

K.MD.A.2  Directly compare two objects with a measurable attribute in common, to see which object has “more of”/”less of” the attribute, and describe the difference.

MP.4  Model with mathematics.  

K.CC  Counting and Cardinality

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1st Grade

PS4.B: Electromagnetic Radiation Objects can be seen if light is available to illuminate them or if they give off their own light.

(1-PS4-2) Some materials allow light to pass through them, others allow only some light through and others block all the light and create a dark shadow on any surface beyond them, where the light cannot reach. Mirrors can be used to redirect a light beam.

LS1.A: Structure and Function. Plants also have different parts (roots, stems, leaves, flowers, fruits) that help them survive and grow

ESS1.A: The Universe and its Stars  Patterns of the motion of the sun, moon, and stars in the sky can be observed, described, and predicted. (1-ESS1-1)

ESS1.B: Earth and the Solar System  Seasonal patterns of sunrise and sunset can be observed, described, and predicted

Patterns in the natural world can be observed, used to describe phenomena, and used as evidence.

Scientific Knowledge Assumes an Order and Consistency in Natural Systems Science assumes natural events happen today as they happened in the past. (1ESS1-1) Many events are repeated.

W.1.8  With guidance and support from adults, recall information from experiences or gather information from provided sources to answer a question

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2nd Grade

PS1.A: Structure and Properties of Matter Different kinds of matter exist and many of them can be either solid or liquid, depending on temperature.

Cause and Effect: Events have causes that generate observable patterns.

LS2.A: Interdependent Relationships in Ecosystems Plants depend on water and light to grow. (2-LS2-1)

MP.4  Model with mathematics

ETS1.B: Developing Possible Solutions Designs can be conveyed through sketches, drawings, or physical models. These representations are useful in communicating ideas for a problem’s solutions to other people.

ESS2.B: Plate Tectonics and Large-Scale System Interactions Maps show where things are located. One can map the shapes and kinds of land and water in any area. (2-ESS2-2)

ESS2.C: The Roles of Water in Earth’s Surface Processes Water is found in the ocean, rivers, lakes, and ponds. Water exists as solid ice and in liquid form

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3rd Grade

SL.3.3  Ask and answer questions about information from a speaker, offering appropriate elaboration and detail

Systems and System Models A system can be described in terms of its components and their interactions. (3-LS4-4)

Scientific Knowledge Assumes an Order and Consistency in Natural Systems Science assumes consistent patterns in natural systems. (3-LS4-1)

MP.4  Model with mathematics

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4th Grade

PS3.B: Conservation of Energy and Energy Transfer Energy is present whenever there are moving objects, sound, light, or heat. When objects collide, energy can be transferred from one object to another, thereby changing their motion. In such collisions, some energy is typically also transferred to the surrounding air; as a result, the air gets heated and sound is produced. (4-PS3-2)

(4-PS3-3) Light also transfers energy from place to place.

MP.2 Reason abstractly and quantitatively. (4-ESS3-1)

MP.4 Model with mathematics. (4-ESS3-1)

 Similarities and differences in patterns can be used to sort and classify natural phenomena. (4PS4-1)

Systems and System Models A system can be described in terms of its components and their interactions

ESS1.C: The History of Planet Earth Local, regional, and global patterns of rock formations reveal changes over time due to earth forces, such as earthquakes. The presence and location of certain fossil types indicate the order in which rock layers were formed. (4-ESS1-1)

ESS2.A: Earth Materials and Systems Rainfall helps to shape the land and affects the types of living things found in a region. Water, ice, wind, living organisms, and gravity break rocks, soils, and sediments into smaller particles and move them around. (4ESS2-1)

ESS2.B: Plate Tectonics and Large-Scale System Interactions The locations of mountain ranges, deep ocean trenches, ocean floor structures, earthquakes, and volcanoes occur in patterns. Most earthquakes and volcanoes occur in bands that are often along the boundaries between continents and oceans. Major mountain chains form inside continents or near their edges. Maps can help locate the different land and water features areas of Earth. (4-ESS2-2)

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5th Grade

PS3.D: Energy in Chemical Processes and Everyday Life The energy released [from] food was once energy from the sun that was captured by plants in the chemical process that forms plant matter (from air and water).

Plants acquire their material for growth chiefly from air and water

LS2.A: Interdependent Relationships in Ecosystems The food of almost any kind of animal can be traced back to plants. Organisms are related in food webs in which some animals eat plants for food and other animals eat the animals that eat plants.

A system can be described in terms of its components and their interactions. (5-LS2-1)

MP.4  Model with mathematics

ESS2.A: Earth Materials and Systems Earth’s major systems are the geosphere (solid and molten rock, soil, and sediments), the hydrosphere (water and ice), the atmosphere (air), and the biosphere (living things, including humans). These systems interact in multiple ways to affect Earth’s surface materials and processes. The ocean supports a variety of ecosystems and organisms, shapes landforms, and influences climate. Winds and clouds in the atmosphere interact with the landforms to determine patterns of weather. (5-ESS2-1)

ESS2.C: The Roles of Water in Earth’s Surface Processes Nearly all of Earth’s available water is in the ocean. Most fresh water is in glaciers or underground; only a tiny fraction is in streams, lakes, wetlands, and the atmosphere.

PS2.B: Types of Interactions The gravitational force of Earth acting on an object near Earth’s surface pulls that object toward the planet’s center. (5-PS2-1)

ESS1.A: The Universe and its Stars The sun is a star that appears larger and brighter than other stars because it is closer. Stars range greatly in their distance from Earth. (5-ESS1-1)

ESS1.B: Earth and the Solar System The orbits of Earth around the sun and of the moon around Earth, together with the rotation of Earth about an axis between its North and South poles, cause observable patterns. These include day and night; daily changes in the length and direction of shadows; and different positions of the sun, moon, and stars at different times of the day, month, and year. (5-ESS1-2)

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6th Grade

ESS1.A: The Universe and Its Stars Patterns of the apparent motion of the sun, the moon, and stars in the sky can be observed, described, predicted, and explained with models. (06-ESS1-1) Earth and its solar system are part of the Milky Way galaxy, which is one of many galaxies in the universe. (06-ESS1-2)

ESS1.B: Earth and the Solar System The solar system consists of the sun and a collection of objects, including planets, their moons, and asteroids that are held in orbit around the sun by its gravitational pull on them. (06-ESS1-2)(06-ESS13) This model of the solar system can explain eclipses of the sun and the moon. Earth’s spin axis is fixed in direction over the short-term but tilted relative to its orbit around the sun. The seasons are a result of that tilt and are caused by the differential intensity of sunlight on different areas of Earth across the year. (06-ESS1-1) The solar system appears to have formed from a disk of dust and gas, drawn together by gravity. (06-ESS1-2)

Patterns can be used to identify cause and effect relationships. (06-ESS1-1)

Scale, Proportion, and Quantity Time, space, and energy phenomena can be observed at various scales using models to study systems that are too large or too small. (06-ESS1-3)

Systems & System Models: Models can be used to represent systems and their interactions. (06-ESS1-2)

06-ESS2-6.  Develop and use a model to describe how unequal heating and rotation of the Earth cause patterns of atmospheric and oceanic circulation that determine regional climates.

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